Monday, March 25, 2019

LANJ President James Moseley of Trip Tracker (left) and Vice President/Legislative Chair Jeff Shanker of A-1 Limousine Atlantic City, N.J. — The Limousine Association of New Jersey (LANJ) held its at-capacity membership meeting during breakfast on November 4 at the Chauffeur Driven Show. The meeting included updates on association activity, informational presentations, and a keynote speaker.

LANJ President James Moseley of Trip Tracker and Vice President/Legislative Chair Jeff Shanker of A-1 Limousine discussed new association business. Shanker spoke of how 11 insurance-related bills, including LANJ’s Assembly Bill 3401, are awaiting a tentatively scheduled December 8 hearing. He also summarized the October 17 Insurance Council of New Jersey meeting that lobbyist Barry Lefkowitz spoke at in regard to TNCs on both a statewide and national scale, especially in terms of how well covered—if at all—New Jersey drivers are if they use personal vehicles for TNCs’ commercial purposes.

Randy O’Neill of Lancer Insurance Company and Michael Marroccoli of The Capacity Group were also on hand to discuss the insurance aspect of the industry. O’Neill provided an update on chauffeured transportation operators’ insurance and regulatory issues, while Marroccoli covered cyber liabilities via his presentation, “Small Business: A Hacker’s Perfect Target,” which explored the many ways that small businesses are vulnerable to cyber-attacks and physical theft alike that could compromise their confidential information.

The Limousine Association of New Jersey’s breakfast meeting at the Chauffeur Driven Show hosted a packed room. The meeting’s keynote speaker was Christopher Rotondo of the Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, who broached the TNC issue by stressing to all in attendance that there is “nothing as powerful as a group working together.” He then spent the bulk of his speech addressing transportation safety concerns, especially within the for-hire industry: “Passenger transportation is one of the safest industries but when it goes bad, it goes bad in a big way.” He cited statistics that estimate 92 people die on the roads every day, 11 of which will be because of a bus or truck.

Rotondo went on to cite fatality numbers in transportation, saying that “When one plane crashes, all hell breaks loose; 92 people die on the roads every day and no one says anything until it’s personal.” He urged operators to follow safety regulations and guidelines, telling the packed room that it’s his job to “always preach safety” and offering his assistance to help everyone adhere to the rules that aim to keep everyone safe on the roads.

The next LANJ meeting is scheduled for January 21.

Visit lanj.org for more information.

[CD1114]