Boston Chauffeur Driven Show
Sunday, August 25, 2019

BY WAYNE BLANCHARD

CD 0514 New Generation Back in December‚ we featured an article detailing second-generation operators; more specifically‚ the children of owners who decided to join the family business. The answers were so varied and interesting that we were compelled to do a second article—this time from the perspective of the parents‚ the people who started and built the company day by day over years‚ good and bad economies‚ and changing environments.

One great lesson learned by looking at the transition through the eyes of the second generation was their appreciation to the lessons and experiences of their parents. Those operators showed that they can bring in new ideas without sacrificing a great formula perfected by their parents. In our journeys through life‚ we all wonder if our parents get us. We think that our point of view is the right one‚ and that our parents “just don’t understand.” Or do they?
Now‚ it’s the parents’ turn to dish on what it’s like to groom their children for the business‚ how they handle work-life balance‚ and cede some control to their offspring. Packed with a lot of good advice‚ this article is the “other perspective” on what it’s really like to work with family.


Sam Amato

President/CEO of Gateway Global in San ­Francisco‚ Calif.
Years in Business: 35
Primary Market: Corporate
Fleet Size: 60+

CD: When did you first bring Joel into the company?
SA: Detailing when he was 8‚ but as he grew older‚ he worked other part-time positions.

CD: Were you reluctant to bring him in at first?
SA: We discussed it after he graduated college‚ and after many conversations‚ I felt it best he look at other opportunities. Joel decided to experience working abroad‚ and went off to London. Upon his return‚ we once again discussed his entering the company. At that point‚ I was comfortable with his experience and made an offer that gave him an opportunity to make a career at Gateway.

CD: What was the most difficult part of having your son as an employee?
SA: Giving up some of my responsibilities.

CD: What was the best part?
SA: Joel is very smart in business. He has a fresh sense of today’s market and a great business education from St. Mary’s University. Also‚ his experience in working in the European marketplace gave us extra insights.

CD: How did this impact your family life?
SA: At first‚ it was great. We were learning so much about one another‚ but then everything became all about business‚ which put a lot of strain on our father-son relationship. Now‚ we learned how to turn business off when we get together outside of work.

CD: Has talking shop outside the office ever interfered with a family function?
SA: I’d have to say yes! But it always ends up with laughter after some smart-ass remarks.

CD: Please explain the difference between disciplining your child at work as opposed to home.
SA: I used to tell him what he couldn’t do at home‚ but now he tells me what I shouldn’t do at work.

CD: When Joel first started‚ how open were you to his ideas?
SA: I was very open to fresh and educated ideas. However‚ I made it very hard on him‚ and he had to prove his ideas. There were times where we just had to agree to disagree.

CD: Has that changed over time and if yes‚ how?
SA: Now‚ I trust his judgment much more and I let him run with his ideas even if I disagree with them.

CD: If you could give any advice to a parent who is bringing a child into the company‚ what would it be?
SA: Make sure they get out and experience the world first. Make sure you really believe they can do the job and do it well. However‚ be sure you let them make the choice of whether or not they want to join the company‚ and not just looking for an easy paycheck.

CD: If you could give any advice to a person joining their parents’ company‚ what would it be?
SA: Be ready to prove yourself not only to your parents and the other employees‚ but also to yourself.


Muhammad Bhatti

CEO of Limo Corp Worldwide in Chicago‚ Ill.
Years in Business: 16
Primary Market: Corporate
Fleet Size: 45

CD: When did you first bring Wasif into the company?
MB: My son started with us as a reservations agent at age 21.

CD: Were you reluctant to bring him in at first?
MB: Yes‚ because this is a tough industry to be in. One has to have a thick skin to work in limousine industry‚ and I was concerned whether or not he would fit in.

CD: You have seen many changes in technologies‚ fleet make-up‚ and the overall industry. How many of these changes were brought to your attention by your son‚ and how open were you to them at first?
MB: As member of older generation it’s little hard to cope with today’s technology‚ but I am a firm believer of being up to date. I know that we have to go with the times; otherwise we will be left behind. I recognize that we are in new era and the new generation is all for that. For that reason whenever Wasif spoke to me about new software on the market or applying any new technology to operate‚ I never discouraged him.

CD: Has there ever been a time when your son suggested a change that you were against at first‚ but then made the change and it turned out to be a successful?
MB: Yes‚ I was reluctant to go worldwide at first‚ but with Wasif’s push we did and it’s proven to be a good idea.

CD: What was the reaction of the other staff when you brought Wasif into senior management?
MB: I did feel a couple of staff members were unhappy or didn’t like that idea. However‚ they settled down in very short period of time. Wasif is a fast learner‚ has very good sense of humor‚ is responsible‚ and he has his ways to get things done in a friendly manner. So it didn’t take long for the people in the office to adjust to him.

CD: Please explain the difference between disciplining your son at work as opposed to home.
MB: At work‚ he is dealt with as an office employee and as a son at home. You can’t mix it up‚ because it will not work.

CD: If you could give any advice to a parent who is bringing a child into the company‚ what would it be?
MB: Treat him professionally at the office like any other employee‚ and not as your child. That will help him to gain confidence. Also when you move him up in the management based on his credentials/proven experience‚ it will be easier for the other employees to accept. Your child will also be trained better.

CD: If you could give any advice to a person joining their parents’ company‚ what would it be?
MB: I think as a son or daughter you can’t make a better decision than to work for your parents. But‚ if you do‚ then work hard to understand every aspect of business and take full responsibility for it. Work together with your parents to take the company to the next level.


Eli Erlich

President of Europe Limousine Service in New York. N.Y.
Years in Business: 20
Primary Market: Corporate
Fleet Size: 103

CD: When did you first bring Jay and Adam into the company?
EE: Jay and Adam both began working at 15 as telephone reservationists‚ billing assistants‚ and computer data processors. They worked every position in our office.

CD: What was the most difficult part of having your sons as employees?
EE: It was difficult to see the boys sometimes affected by the stress of the business‚ but as they grew confident in the industry and got older they handled the stress perfectly.

CD: What was the best part?
EE: It’s seeing what wonderful businessmen they have become. They have a great fondness and respect for the limousine business. They are very well prepared in managing the operations and employees.

CD: Did you want your sons to follow in your footsteps or make their own way?
EE: By sending Jay and Adam to universities‚ they had the tools and opportunities to pursue any career they wanted. We always encouraged our children to study and succeed in any field that interested them. It was a nice surprise that they fell in love with the limousine business and to them it is not a job‚ it is their career.

CD: Please explain the difference between disciplining your child at work as opposed to home.
EE: At home we would yell‚ lecture‚ and even punish them as they were growing up. At the office we would never reprimand them in front of the other employees. We would take them aside in our office and explain to them how to improve their performances in the future. A parent needs to teach their child how to perform better and more correctly in the workplace without making him feel a loss of self-esteem.

CD: Is there a particularly funny story about your child working at your company that you would like to share?
EE: A few years ago when Jay was helping out the dispatchers as needed‚ he covered the night dispatcher’s shift one evening. Everything was going smoothly and it seemed as though Jay had the overnight shift well managed. In the middle of the night‚ I woke up to check on Jay and noticed on the camera that he fell asleep at the dispatcher’s table. I spoke to him through the intercom and called several times‚ but he was out like a light. I had to drive to the office in the middle of the night to wake Jay up; he jumped out of his chair in a fright. He definitely learned his lesson!

CD: If you could give any advice to a parent who is bringing a child into the company‚ what would it be?
EE: It’s a wonderful experience. The parent and child begin the process of sharing personal as well as business experiences‚ which then becomes common interests and ideas through the growth of the business.

CD: If you could give any advice to a person joining their parents’ company‚ what would it be?
EE: Remember that your parents are mostly right! Remember to be respectful to them even if you are dealing with work-related stress or disagreements. Respect must be given and received so that both can grow together successfully in the business environment. Each has a lot to learn from the other.


Neil Goodman

CEO of Aventura Worldwide Transportation ­Service in Miami‚ Fla.
Years in Business: 23
Primary Market: Corporate
Fleet Size: 100

CD: At what position and age did Scott enter the company?
NG: He started in dispatch and reservations when he was 35.

CD: How open were you to new ideas and changes he had?
NG: Very open. He was a Marine Corps veteran‚ so he had great skills of leadership. He also spent 12 years in professional sports‚ dealing with athletes‚ management‚ and ownership of an NHL franchise‚ so he brought qualities that could only enhance our company.

CD: Over the years‚ you have seen many changes in our industry. How many of these changes did he bring to your attention‚ and how open were you to them?
NG: Since I’m from the “old school‚” many changes were suggested. However‚ I was always open to hearing and considering his ideas and advice.

CD: Have there been any changes or ideas that he suggested or implemented that really flopped?
NG: I wouldn’t say flopped‚ however‚ being from the Marines‚ he had a very “structured” philosophy. He thought that people simply performed their jobs‚ filled their shifts‚ went home‚ and then reported back the next day. He wanted people who went on vacation or took days off to NEVER be called or bothered for any reason. He learned quickly that when running a small‚ family-owned business‚ those structured ideals were impossible.

CD: What was the reaction of other staff when you brought him into senior management?
NG: Being that the majority of the staff were‚ and still are‚ younger than me‚ they welcomed young leadership and new technologies. They liked a point of view that was along the same lines as theirs.

CD: Whose idea was it to bring your son into the company?
NG: 100 percent my idea. I wanted to “hand it down” to my son‚ and give him the choice of handing it down to his children.

CD: Please explain the difference between disciplining at home and at the office?
NG: His mother did the majority of his disciplining at home. Plus‚ if there had to be any disciplining at work‚ it was generally him disciplining ME!

CD: Have there ever been any times that you regretted bringing your son into this demanding and stressful industry?
NG: Yes! Once the frivolous litigation began against our industry‚ the feelings of gratification were replaced with constant stress and depositions.

CD: If you could give any advice to a parent bringing their child into the business‚ what would it be?
NG: Let them put their “stamp” on things. Let them make certain executive decisions without fear of you overruling them. But‚ if you do have to overrule or overturn their decision‚ explain exactly why you had to do it.


Maninder Grewal

CEO of Griffin Transportation WW Chauffeured Services in Vancouver‚ British Colombia
Years in Business: 15
Primary Market: Corporate
Fleet Size: 35

CD: When did you first bring Tara into the company?
MG: Answering phones and dispatching on a part-time basis after school and on weekends at 16. We were a small operation.

CD: When she first started‚ how open were you to any ideas she came up with?
MG: We were very open to her ideas and thoughts and discussed them at length and implemented them into our system that affected the company’s bottom line. Over the next 6 years she learned and honed her skills and contributed to the development of the company.

CD: You have seen many changes in our overall industry. How many of these changes were brought to your attention by Tara‚ and how open were you to them at first?
MG: I have always been open to change. However‚ she has brought awareness to the ever-changing technology and its importance. She has helped to bring in a state-of-the-art reservation system‚ tablets‚ smartphones‚ mobile apps‚ to name a few. She has focused on recruitment and training of new staff‚ and evaluated our fleet makeup to ensure that we have the appropriate fleet to meet the demand. She has brought back many ideas and implemented them.

CD: Did you want your children to follow in your footsteps or make their own way?
MG: I wanted my children to get an education and pursue their own careers. However‚ at the same time‚ if I am able to bring my children into the business‚ they have to give me 120 percent to ensure the business will prosper after I’m gone.

CD: How do you avoid a situation of favoritism?
MG: This is a tough one to answer as I have two children: my daughter who is the eldest and my son who also works in the company on part-time basis. They both think differently and act differently and sometimes it is a challenge to ensure you have resolved the issues in the company’s best interests. However‚ I am now glad that my son has chosen a different career path.

CD: How can other parents avoid that type of scenario?
MG: I think all parents should ensure that their children get an education and let them pursue the career paths they would like. Do not try to bring them into business unless they show interest in it as well.

CD: Has your working relationship ever had any adverse ­effects on your family relationship?
MG: I would be lying if I said no‚ but you work through them and develop a stronger relationship and guide your children to the best of your ability.

CD: Have there been times when you regretted bringing your child into this demanding industry?
MG: That thought is always in the back of your mind: did I do the right thing? But when I needed help I turned to my children for the help so we could keep things going‚ and one day they may be able to reap the rewards of their labor.

CD: Is it better to bring a child in the company young so they can “grow up” with it and learn the skills early‚ or wait until they are older and more mature?
MG: In my opinion‚ only bring them in if they are interested in this industry as it is very stressful and requires a lot of attention to detail. It would be best to wait and let them come to you and say they are interested. Sit them down and let them know what is required and be sure they understand. Then‚ and only then‚ start teaching them the aspects of the business.

CD: If you could give any advice to a parent who is bringing a child into the company‚ what would it be?
MG: Always bring them in on the ground floor and have them work their way up and ensure they understand all aspects of the business as one day they will be following into your footsteps.

CD: If you could give any advice to a person joining their parents’ company‚ what would it be?
MG: Listen to your parents—they have a lot of experience and have built their respective business. Observe and take in the information they have provided to you. When you come with ideas‚ ensure you provide the advantages and disadvantages‚ but in the end you must respect their decision.


Robert “Bob” Levine

President of Hy’s Limousine Worldwide in New Haven‚ Conn.
Years in Business: 63
Primary Market: Corporate
Fleet Size: 110

CD: When did you first bring Matt into the company?
RL: I brought Matt in as a management trainee at 29.

CD: Were you reluctant to bring him in at first?
RL: Yes‚ I wasn’t sure if our personalities would mesh well enough to work together on a day-to-day basis.

CD: Did you receive any negative reactions from staff?
RL: Not at first‚ but within a short time‚ many of my employees began to ask if my son was staying‚ and if so‚ at what position and level.

CD: What was the most difficult part of having Matt as an ­employee?
RL: Giving him direction as when to arrive and leave. During busy times‚ I arrive early and leave late. It was obvious his schedule was going to be different.

CD: What was the best part?
RL: Knowing I was going to have the chance of continuing the business with a third generation for a company that I grew‚ after my father‚ Hyman J. Levine started.

CD: When he first started‚ how open were you to any ideas he came up with?
RL: Not too open. I was set in my ways‚ old fashioned‚ and definitively reluctant to change.

CD: Has that changed over time?
RL: Yes! His ideas are fresh‚ innovative‚ and geared toward today’s market‚ clientele‚ and future generational needs.

CD: Has your working relationship ever had any adverse ­effects on your family relationship?
RL: Yes! There times when a bad day at work can affect your evening. You have to learn to make an effort to put it behind you; otherwise those around you will bear the brunt of the situation without even being involved.
CD: Please explain the difference between disciplining your son at work as opposed to home.
RL: It’s very difficult. First‚ he’s an adult and feelings get hurt easier. Second‚ it must be behind closed doors to protect his position with the company. Lastly‚ comments must make sense. Time out is good‚ but time away is not and will not solve the issue.

CD: Is there a particularly funny story about Matt working at your company that you would like to share?
RL: I remember going to a trade show a few years back. Matt had already been doing quite a bit of networking and had taken on an increased responsibility in the company‚ and many of the younger attendees at the show‚ upon meeting me responded: “Oh‚ you’re Matt’s dad.” I knew at that point he had made an impact.

CD: If you could give any advice to a parent who is bringing a child into the company‚ what would it be?
RL: Have them work for someone else‚ preferably in this industry. This way‚ they can see how to reach the end result without having personal relationships involved.

CD: If you could give any advice a person joining their ­parents’ company‚ what would it be?
RL: You must realize that you’re going into a marriage of sorts. There will be good and bad days‚ but family overrides all.


Dave Murray

President/CEO of Total Luxury Limousine in Minneapolis/St. Paul
Years in business: 27
Primary Market: Majority corporate
Fleet Size: 55

CD: At what positions and ages did you first bring Nicholas and Charlie into the company?
DM: They both started as detailers when they were just kids. They both pursued careers in other cities before coming back to work for me. Nicholas officially joined the firm at 20‚ as the main dispatcher. Charlie worked part-time until he was 24 while he also managed movie theaters in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area‚ then as co-owner of some Detroit theaters. When the partnership dissolved‚ he came to work for me. He was 35.

CD: What was the most difficult part of having your sons as employees?
DM: When I first purchased my commercial building‚ I thought that I would eventually sell it and the company and retire with a nice tidy sum. They both decided that they wanted to keep running it‚ so that idea is gone.

CD: What was the best part?
DM: I truly enjoy working with them. They are both very different personalities and are‚ therefore‚ very different in their strengths. They each take care of different aspects of the business and work well together.

CD: When they first started‚ how open were you to any ideas they came up with?
DM: I like to think I’ve always listened to them and seriously looked at the merit of their ideas. They may give you a different answer!

CD: You have seen many changes in the overall industry. How many of these changes were brought to your attention by your sons‚ and how open were you to them at first?
DM: My sons have been the driving force behind our moving into the corporate world and keeping us current in technology. They are working to update our fleet‚ website‚ and software. They supervise my employees and keep everything running. I enjoy going to work knowing that they will be there.

CD: Has there ever been a time when your sons suggested a change that you were against at first‚ but then made the change and it turned out to be a successful?
DM: When Nick first broached the subject of purchasing an in-house car wash I resisted because of the cost. He convinced me that we would need to hire another detailer if we didn’t. We purchased the car wash and I don’t know how we managed without it.

CD: Have there been times when you regretted bringing your sons into this demanding industry?
DM: Our industry is indeed stressful and demanding‚ but with the three of us working‚ we are able to take vacations and days off when necessary. We also are able to work flexible schedules to take care of personal business when it comes up. We have four professional sports teams in Minn.‚ transportation contacts with all of them. We have access to tickets for games and concerts‚ restaurants‚ and hotels. We make sure we have other activities together and apart‚ not just work.

CD: If you could give any advice to a parent who is bringing a child into the company‚ what would it be?
DM: I Googled “family businesses” and found this quote:
“According to Family Firm Institute‚ just over 30 percent of family businesses survive into the next generation. Only about 12 percent survive into the third generation and less than three percent continue to exist beyond that.”

This is a sobering fact. I think you need to know your kids. If you have clashing personalities and don’t really get along with them at home‚ why would you think you would want them to work for you? My kids started at the bottom and worked their way up. They also worked in different fields‚ which may have helped. Remember to allow your kids training opportunities just like any other employee. They will need all of those skills to take your business to the next level.

CD: If you could give any advice to a person joining their parents’ company‚ what would it be?
DM: Don’t be arrogant‚ lazy‚ or feel entitled. You will have to work harder than anyone else to get the respect you are looking for‚ from your parents AND other employees.


John Patti

Retired CEO of Buffalo Limousine in Buffalo‚ N.Y.
Years in Business: 54
Primary Market: Corporate
Fleet Size: 24

CD: When did you first bring Carla into the company?
JP: Carla and her sister Julie were both brought in to handle and transport luggage for musicians in their mid teens.

CD: Were you reluctant to bring them in at first?
JP: I welcomed it! I lived this industry—ate‚ slept‚ and breathed the limousine business—and I always knew I wanted it to continue to be a family business‚ so I structured everything around that thought.

CD: Did you receive any negative reactions from staff?
JP: Not exactly negative‚ but more dismissive. They thought that they were the boss’ daughters and they were just here to play. They figured it was a phase that wouldn’t last very long. When my staff saw what they were capable of‚ they were all on board.

CD: What was the most difficult part of having your children as employees?
JP: I have a very strong personality. The thought of‚ at some point‚ having to hand over control was daunting.

CD: What was the best part?
JP: It was pride‚ in fact. All of the blood‚ sweat‚ and tears invested in this company‚ and knowing that all that work would stay in the family made it a great idea.

CD: When they first started‚ how open were you to any ideas they came up with?
JP: I was always open to ideas‚ even if I only used some of them. I took each idea according to the merit of the suggestion‚ rather than the age or experience of the person suggesting it.

CD: Has that changed over time?
JP: As the industry changed‚ we had to adapt. I saw what Carla could do‚ and knew that she had the ability to adapt her way of thinking according to the needs of the industry.

CD: Whenever you had to discipline them at work‚ did it have any effect on your home life?
JP: We’re Sicilian! There were times when we wouldn’t speak for days‚ which made for a difficult work atmosphere. In the end‚ it was never a major setback.

CD: Is there a particularly funny story about your daughters working at your company that you would like to share?
JP: Back when the girls were in their teens and working baggage handling‚ Jerry Garcia came to town. Wherever he went‚ he brought this massive stair-master exercise machine with him. This big‚ bulky machine was awkward and heavy. To see these two little girls struggling with it and arguing back and forth about the best way to handle this was almost an Abbott and Costello moment. It was really quite a sight to see‚ and a miracle they ever got that thing moved.

CD: If you could give any advice to a parent who is bringing a child into the company‚ what would it be?
JP: The key is to be sure that your business life is always business life‚ and family life is always family life. Always work hard to keep them as separate as you possibly can.
CD: If you could give any advice to a person joining their parents’ company‚ what would it be?
JP: Work hard because it’s not a free ride. Eventually that business will be yours and the employees will only continue to work hard for you if they see that you’re going to work hard for them. Also‚ your parents have the experience you lack. Listen! Drink it all in and take advantage of an education you could never buy in any university.


Ron Stein

CEO of Exclusive Sedan Service in North Hollywood. Calif.
Years in Business: 34
Primary Market: Motion Picture/Studios‚ Corporate
Fleet Size: 31

CD: When did you first bring Brandan into the company?
RS: While he was still in high school‚ he started part-time washing cars and filing. He was 15 at the time.

CD: Were you reluctant to bring him in at first?
RS: Not at part time‚ but when he wanted to come full time‚ I instead wanted him to finish college and pursue a different career so he wouldn’t be a slave to the company as I was.

CD: Whose idea was it to bring him into the company?
RS: Brandan was relentless in his pursuit to work here.

CD: What was the most difficult part of having him as an ­employee?
RS: Our time together outside the office became all about business rather than father-son quality time. Also‚ by trying not to show favoritism‚ I was harder on him than I was on the others.

CD: Did having him working for you change your family life‚ and if so how?
RS: In the beginning‚ all Brandan wanted to talk about was work when around family and friends. Now we appreciate our time together more and only talk shop on the way to surf ... sorry‚ I mean business meetings and business travel.

CD: Were there any ideas or changes that he suggested that you were against at first‚ but made the change and it turned out to be successful?
RS: Yes‚ a few. It was his idea to take on affiliate work‚ get rid of poor performers‚ growth by numbers‚ add vehicles‚ and change pay structures. Although I wasn’t in favor at first‚ he sold the ideas to me‚ using facts and figures‚ and in the end‚ they turned out to be great ideas.

CD: Was there any idea he suggested that really flopped? If so‚ how did that affect your confidence in him?
RS: Yes. In 2010‚ when the economy was still weak‚ we took on too many accounts and also reduced the price structure. Exclusive was having some of its largest gross growth during the recession‚ but at the same time he took his eyes off the financials. He forgot that anything over 30 percent growth does three things: depletes cash flow‚ cash‚ and profits; strips old systems; and burns out your team. He had to fix all three things in a short time and prove to me how everything was going to work moving forward. In the end‚ he worked hard and restored my confidence in him.

CD: What is your current role in the company?
RS: Good question! You can say CEO or full-time/semi-retired! I love this industry‚ so it isn’t really hard work. When there’s a good surf‚ I surf‚ which fortunately is about 100 days out of the year.

CD: Is there a particularly funny story about Brandan working for the company that you’d like to share?
RS: Oh yes! When Brandan was 16‚ we had a last-minute request for a picture limo to be on the set for the movie “Man on the Moon‚” starring Jim Carrey. At the time‚ Brandan only had his license about four months. He was only supposed to drop off the car and get a ride back from the transport captain. They instead wanted him to be the chauffeur in the scene‚ so he was sent to wardrobe to get suited up and behind the wheel. In the scene‚ Carrey’s character was being chased by bikers and the limo was supposed to pull over so Carrey could jump out and confront the bikers. Brandan was supposed to stop at a certain mark‚ hit the door lock button so Carrey could jump out and go at it with the bikers. Needless to say‚ he had a hard time‚ but Carrey graciously took the blame as well as the screaming of the director. There’s another scene he did on “Sex and the City” at the Playboy Mansion that required his helping bunnies out of the grotto‚ but that’s one for another time!

CD: If you could give any advice to a parent who is bringing a child into the company‚ what would it be?
RS: Be patient! Expose them to every aspect of the business and support them. However‚ let them earn everything on their own.

CD: If you could give any advice to a person joining their ­parents’ company‚ what would it be?
RS: Be patient‚ listen‚ and learn every aspect of the business by doing ­every job from cleaning cars‚ to CSR‚ to chauffeuring. Learn everything the company has to offer.

As we learned with the first article‚ there is no “typical” path to joining the family business‚ although there does tend to be at least one common piece of advice among the parents: have your offspring learn every aspect of the company before becoming a senior manager. Some kids started working for the company when they were young‚ others pursued their own careers and then joined the ranks—it’s all subjective and based on the will of both the parent and the child. For the kids‚ it’s about learning to flex your muscle and prove that you are capable of leadership‚ while for the parents‚ it’s learning to treat their children as not only adults‚ but in many cases as partners in the business‚ which can be a tough role reversal for any parent. But all agree that it’s a rewarding experience that comes with a good amount of struggle‚ but also pride in knowing that you’re continuing to build a company with a person—or people—you help to build into an adult. [CD0514]